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APPELLATE &
      ETHICS BLOG

Welcome to our Appellate & Ethics Blog!

This blog will sometimes be scholarly, sometimes purely practical, and sometimes just musings by members of the firm on life in the appellate courts and on professional responsibility.

When we comment on cases, we do so with care, but you should always read the cases yourself before using them for any reason.

When one of us muses on matters, it may or may not reflect the innermost thoughts of the others. Feel free to ask.

If we talk about a case in which we represented a party, we’ll let you know it was ours.

We welcome suggestions, to a point, on relevant topics of interest and comments on the thoughts and suggestions we include on this blog.

But most of all, we hope that you learn from and enjoy these entries!

            Each year the justices of the Supreme Court and judges of the Appellate Court make amendments to Connecticut’s Rules of Appellate Procedure.  Many of these are minor technical modifications.  The following highlights rule changes of which practitioners shou...

            For a while on the morning of June 4th, my Facebook newsfeed suggested the sky was falling because the Supreme Court ruled in favor of a baker who refused to make a custom wedding cake for a same-sex couple.  The sky did have the potential to fall because a...

Finally! The Appellate Court Recognizes that Finality Is Confusing

By Kenneth J. Bartschi, Partner

            When an interlocutory order is final for purposes of appeal often involves a daunting inquiry.  An otherwise interlocutory order is immediately appealable where...

            Maybe it’s family cases. Or maybe it’s because the view on the difference between subject matter jurisdiction and the court’s authority to act has evolved somewhat.  Or maybe it’s that the courts tend not be consistent in their vocabulary, but for whatever...

            Maybe it’s family cases. Or maybe it’s because the view on the difference between subject matter jurisdiction and the court’s authority to act has evolved somewhat.  Or maybe it’s that the courts tend not be consistent in their vocabulary, but for whatever...

            The First Amendment to the United States Constitution begins: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof . . . .”  The inherent tension between these two phrases was at play in...

            As I recently noted, on June 26, 2017—the anniversary of three major gay rights cases:  Lawrence, Windsor, and Obergefell—the United States Supreme Court granted certiorari in Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd....

            June is LGBT pride month and this year it concludes with a decision out of the Texas Supreme Court showing that much work remains to secure LGBT civil rights.

             On Monday (June 26), the United Stat...

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